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with the united states to overturn gadhafi and police libya these last years but opened relationships with al qaeda and the darkest elements of the jihadists. there's suggestion ambassador stevens was murdered in revenge for the death of a libyan hero to the al qaeda forces al-libbi killed by a drone strike june 4th. >> john, what you're saying is round up the usual suspect, you're saying they have not really caught the perpetrators who killed ambassador stevens? >> the perpetrators are al qaeda and the jihadists of the uma. it's a vast organization. >> thank you for that. let me go to paul wulff wits, former deputy secretary of defense. thank you for coming back on the program. what's your take on this? president obama said no act of terror will go unpunished. he said we're going to bring them all to justice. what happens now? how do we bring them all to justice? >> clearly, we're talking about libya, it will happen with the cooperation of the libyans. one of the important things to put in context here, it's almost lost in everything i've heard is back in july the libyans had a pretty fair e
, and the united states. look, we know that china used to be one of the world's great growth engines. it almost single handedly kept the global economy afloat during the global recession. but after playing the roe of the world's economic engine for so long, the chinese locomotive seems to be in danger of running off the rails. each piece of data is weaker than the last. so what's good about that? well, the slowdown in china seems somewhat self-inflicted. governments hit the brakes and in many ways still seems like it's happening. the hope is the chinese will start cutting rates, adding real octane to the down shift in their economy. how about europe? the european central bank meeting this week and we're expecting to hear some chatter in unison that's going to ereverse the declining economies over there and maybe unite to save the spanish banking system. you can monitor these efforts by watching the largest spanish bank which has been climbing ever since it bottomed at $4 and change. $7 stock finishing up 0.182%. that's positive. what changed or reversed this stock which i consider to be the mos
mortgages and potentially other assets until we see unemployment improve in the united states, is that a good decision on his part? >> it's not my habit to comment on decisions of the sister institutions. i would only say that it demonstrates, also, that when you look at the advanced economy through the grade of the central banking, you see that we are all engaged in nonstandard measures. >> how worried are you about the fiscal cliff in the united states is this. >> i think it is part of course of the major issue that in the advanced world you have to cope with. >> but if it happens, does it bring on another recession in the united states? >> i'm sure that the u.s. leadership, whatever you have in the president discussion of course between the two major sensitivities, but a sense of the saw peer kror interests of the country will prevail. i'm absolutely confident in that. i don't trust that it is possible that the sense of the superior interests of the united states of america and by way of consequence of the entire of course advanced economy and by way of consequence the enti
.2 million people infected with hiv here in the united states, jim and about 20% to 25% of those individuals are unaware that they're affected. and what's most concerning is it's those individuals who are affected but unaware. they're responsible for 50 to 70% of the forward transmission. so our objective is to put it out there to make it easier for people to know their history status. >> do you envision a world where someone has unprotected sex, they would go to the drugstore and get this within 72 hours? >> we have spent a lot of time making sure consumers can understand the appropriate use of the product. it's not designed to detect infection immediately after someone is infected. but it's the exactly the same technology that's used in doctors offices and the public health centers. this is the rapid leading history test in the united states and now we're making it available to consumers. >> our show has been focused on hepatitis c. you've got a test for it, but you just don't think -- you talk about it as a billion dollar opportunity, but it's not as big for your company as this one. >> w
day now. let's take the three big bad/good battlegrounds. china, europe, and the united states. look, we know that china used to be one of the world's great growth engines. it almost singlehandedly kept the global economy afloat during the global recession as the chinese communists figured out how to spur domestic spending. but after playing the role of the world's economic engine for so long, the chinese locomotive seems to be in danger of running off the rails. each piece of data is weaker than the last. so what's good about that? well, much of the slowdown in china seems somewhat self-inflicted. when the pure si realized it overstimulated the economy, governments hit the brakes and in many ways still seems like it's happening. the hope is that the chinese will stop stepping on the brake pedal but start cutting rates, adding real ago taken to the downshift in their economy. how about europe? the european central bank meeting this week and we're expecting to hear some chatter in unison that's going to reverse the declining economies over there and maybe unite to save the spanish ban
renaissance. we're gaining market share here in the united states and the riots in china over the weekend support our notion that in the future do you want to put manufacturing facilities overseas or in the united states? this weekend is why you want to put them in the united states. >> peter, tell me what the market right now is saying to you. it would seem to me that since bernanke came out a week or so ago with the announcement of qe3 that the market has kind of moved back a little bit. we've had a few sort of down days as though the market were saying, he gave us what we expected and now it's time to get a little smart. >> it's time to get smart. the earning season could be choppy. i think a lot of people are waiting for that. actually, that's a smart move. don't think you'll see much in the next probably three weeks that will motivate anybody in either direction very seriously. i would like to say i'm a little more positive about it. i think i might be in the minority on this, but i do think we'll probably see some surprises -- >> you got the earnings season right up against the elec
transplants here in the united states. even with a transplant, the hepatitis will go right on attacking the new liver. this is a huge disease. it afflicts 170 million people around the world. which from a human perspective is just terrible, tragic. from a business perspective, these companies are involved. hep c can be a $20 million market opportunity. it's too darn good for many drug companies to pass up. now, i've talked about the game-changing new drugs developed for hep c on the show. but in recent months, there's been a reshuffling, major changes in the competitive race. i've got to keep you up on it. that's why tonight, i want to keep this opportunity in front of you and let you know who will benefit the most from the reshuffling of the order, the changes that have gone on and who can be the winners here. there are a lot of horses in this race. there was bristol-myers, abbott labs, gilead, merck, johnson & johnson, aventis. six months ago bristol-myers was in the definite lead. but one of the patients taking their hep c drug in the clinical trial had a heart attack. and the compan
quickly and when. >> the united states has not had a current the account surplus since 1991. if we were on the gold standard, we just might not have anymore gold left. >> didn't we pass that so long ago? >> the dollar is not a weak currency. the dollar probably needs to be weaker in order to be more competitive, but you can't say that about every currency in the world. certainly in japan the currency has gotten too strong and you now they have the additional problems because of all of the riots going on, the conflict in china over these islands. and that's going to hurt japan again. so japan needs more than just a currency fix. the united states i think you can argue the currency is overvalued in a more fundamental way, but japan has lots of problems. >> do you play currencies? good >> only through companies listed in the u.s. we're not hedging. >> not hedges because -- >> because if we knew where currencies have gone, you'd be the smartest person around. the euro goes to 1.30 -- so it's hard. you have to get fundamentals right and then currency will take care of it. >> what's the diffe
're quite anxious to find a partner in the united states to roll it through america. talk me through that, if you would. >> this is a start in one of our hotels as a food and beverage outlet in t2000. people kept asking me who owns the franchise nor the noodle house, we want one in our place. i said, we own the franchise. so we started to put a whole franchise and team together on what i hope will be, and i think we have achieved it on a very professional basis. and when then we started to franchise in other units. we started with six units we own and operate in dubai. now we are operating 20 across the world. we actually have 123 signed up in our pipeline. and we would very much like to be in the united states. we have had discussions, serious discussions about taking the name out there on a franchise basis. so it just really grew out of one of the -- as a restaurant outfit in one of the hotels. >> let me ask you finally, you're a member of the hotel industry and you sit on one of the boards, and it is an industry finding its voice saying, we are and saying, look, we are jobs, we are gro
of a significant downturn in the united states economy. >> so if you have a downturn, there's a possibility that you don't have that right mix and that you could have a downturn. the odds of that are comparatively low but i worry about it because it's significant possibility. i described it as though, imagine you're on an airplane that's flying from here to los angeles, you're probably going to get there okay but if you hit an air pocket and meaning if the economy goes down, there's not an easy way to reverse it. monetary policy is less effective because when you buy a bond, when the federal reserve makes a purchase, that has the effect of giving money to somebody who won't put that money into something like that bond. and that money does not easily go to people who spend it, that's a balance between monetary and fiscal policy and i worry about the policymakers getting that balance right. that's a possibility and a scary possibility. other than that, i think the most likely situation is we will fly successfully from here to los angeles essentially but we have longer risks. you need a balanc
a stake in and it's tesla here in the united states. they're coming out and saying that they're developing plans, they'll have to slow things down, not going as quickly as originally thought. any concerns about the demand in the future for the electric car given your investment in tesla? >> i think the oem is never in a hype mode as some of the media was as far as electric cars are concerned. this transition will happen. it's a long transition. we're very very beginning. we'll see customers, but of course so far it's a niche and will take time to develop. we will continue to pioneer this market and in 10 or 20 year, electric cars will play a significant role. >> doctor, thank you for joining us live from the paris auto show. joe, becky, andrew, it does not lk like there's a bottom. we're hearing from ceos and they are not seeing a bottom yet. are you looking out at 2015, 2016 before the auto industry can say, okay, at least we see a base here. >> bad news add to go a pile of bad news we've heard recently. phil, thank you very much. and we do want to have you back here soon to talk to us mo
's happening in the united states. >> certainly that's going to bring down the large indices and i just wonder if you think in the fourth quarter there will be a put from central banks or from hedge fund managers that have to play catchup or could we look at the last three months last year? >> central banks are obviously very powerful. you know the old saying, don't fight the fed. you have to be very careful. but as you stretch out the time rise and what you find historically is there is no relationship between liquidity and stock market movement. but i think what's much more important is your original question, if the profit cycle continues to decelerate, i think that's what people want to think about and that's what people want to position their portfolios for. i still think personally that you want to look at more defensive sectors which i think are less prone to have these big earnings disappointments right now. >> rich, can you put together these two knows in the market that you want to be in more dmfticily oriented companies and also this other thought in the market that you want to be i
improves, which is what seems to be happening in europe, which may be china stimulus, united states, then there's room enough for everybody. i think boeing is a dirt cheap stock and i really urge people to buy this. i've been doing it for my charitable trust. let's go to ira in california. ira. >> caller: hey, jim, this is ira, former marine corps captain serving in the first gulf war and a resident of passaic, new jersey. i've got a question about annalie. i want to do it as quick as possible so i don't get cut off over here. >> no, that's okay. >> caller: prior to the fed coming out this morning i saw a downgrade from some loon that has a 15.50 target on it and its concern is they only have a 50% profit margin versus chimera and agc which has 97% and 87%. enough of that. >> right. >> caller: my questions are -- i've got two little questions. i always do my research, but one thing i don't understand is now that the fed came out and he's buying back mortgage-backed securities at a rate of $40 billion a month -- >> right. >> caller: -- one, i don't know how that's going to affect a a
, the united states. some income producers, growth names and stocks with solid dividend boosts and, of course, some gold. these have been the correct calls to make. i've stuck with this market because i believe europeans are not suicidal. so far so good on that front. at least of late. i believe chinese economy will simply come back by virtue of the fact there's a tremendous urban migration within china. i believe the federal reserve's stance, brought about you by ben bernanke, will serve as a bridge over fiscal cliff and not take us down. the federal stance will take higher paying dividend companies into gems, seeking income, we'll band in bonds of cash poor countries and buy cash rick countries with yields that well exceed treasuries and still own a lot of gold. there's not a nation on earth that doesn't want its currency lower. that reserve currency is gold. also not to toot my own horn too hard, but throughout this period i recognized primecy of some bigger stocks, intel, wells fargo, verizon come to mind or the recognition you must own, not trade, own apple until it's too expensive versu
of that is in brazil. while largo and most important comes from the need to find oil in the united states where technology needs to exploit the new fields. tells you that a futures plunge takes forever. the price to climb for oil is not going to happen people. there is not a flut glut of oil. remember to buy the best of the breed. the names that are in the aih. i know my travel trust. it will be doing the exact same thing. stick with kramer. i'll have more awkward conversations than i'm equipped for because i'm raising two girls on my own. i'll worry about the economy more than a few times before they're grown. but it's for them, so i've found a way. who matters most to you says the most about you. massmutual is owned by our policyholders so they matter most to us. massmutual. we'll help you get there. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. le
production. we have nat gas as a big benefit. natural gas in the united states is cheaper than foreign locales. we have that as a cost advantage. we have cheaper electricity and better equipment on the ground. i would see u.s. exports of refined petroleum products continuing to grow, help the manufacturing centers, helping our business. >> say i'm a businessman with a lot of money. i listen to you. i want to open a refinery right next to you. is it tougher to site a refinery than we think? >> incredibly tough. >> we haven't built a lot. >> we modernized the plants we have. a year, two years in permitting, three or four in execution. building refineries in the country, very tough to do. the most likely place it will happen is in the backyard of the existing plants. that's what we are doing for example in woods cross near salt lake city, utah. expanding from 30,000 to 44,000 barrels a day. >> one last question. i'm thinking why don't you own a thousand gas stations? you have the low cost refined product. you sell it to people. the other guys i follow have stations do they have the wrong
mall fillers, juvaderm, grew high single digit miss the united states. why will the second half be better? one of our competitors was taken off the market by an injunction. we are now regaining market share, year over year we should do better than market growth. 82% market share again in july. >> we spent a lot of time on migraine. i'm starting to see the ads. all these medical ads make it sound like you don't want to take the product. they have a million warnings. but are they driving people to the thousand some migraine specialists you have trained? >> we have both in print branded ads and unbranded ads which talk about the disease awareness about chronic migraine. we have tv ads unbranded as well. in a little way we could say there is a little bit of google how many minutes do they go through and do they go all the way to find a doctor. we have trained neurologists and there is the link. >> i promised you last time because you said, listen, jim. this is big. this is a big second half story. >> yeah. well, first of all, continual growth on this first indication and neurogenic
the united states. why will the second half be better? one of our competitors was taken off the market by an injunction. we are now regaining market share, er go, year over year, we should do better in market growth. 82% market share again in july. then the other driver, of course, is therapeutic as you said during your intro. and there we have migraine picking up steadily and also neurogenic bladder coming behind that. >> we spent a lot of time on migraine. i'm starting to see the ads. the ads obviously -- all these medical ads make it sound like you don't want to take the product. they have a million warnings. but are those ads driving people to the 1,000-some migraine specialists that you have trained? >> yes, of course, we have both in print branded ads and unbranded ads which talk about the disease awareness about chronic migraine. and in fact, we have tv ads unbranded as well. of course, in a little way we could say there is a little bit of google maybe hidden in allergan as well because, of course, we can monitor exactly how many people click on the site and then how many people
's take a look at the broader picture. again, the futures here in the united states look a little better after what was a pretty lousy day yesterday. i think it was the worst day for dow in the entire month of december. it was the worst day for the nasdaq in two months and it was the worst day for the s&p in throe months. oil prices continued to push lower and they do once again this morning. they're down another 64 cents to $90 and change. that's been the one bright spot that's been helping out things like the transports, but again, yesterday, every single one of these sectors is down. yesterday we saw a dip below 1.7%. let's call up the dollar board right now. you'll see what happened with these. dollar is a little stronger against the euro, but that's not saying a whole lot. 1.2865. we're also taking a look at the yen. never mind, i lost it there. gold prices are barely budging, 17.66. >> plasser said something yesterday -- >> he said it's not going to help. >> he said he didn't agree with it, it's not going to help and it's going to be hard to get out. >> right. raise the risks. >> j
in 19 states. sad lit prison market here in the united states is enormous, about $74 billion. i think corrections corp is a pretty long runway for growth. that's considering right now only about 10% of the prison population is outsourced. the stock had a massive run. trading at 20 times last year's earnings, 10% growth rate which would ordinarily make it too pricey for me end of story. the thing is corrections corp has been rallying in anticipation of the company converting to a real estate investment trust which gets special tax treatment as long as it returns 90% of its profits to shareholders in dividends. if the irs gives them permission you could see them popping 20% on the news. northbound if the government rejects their weak conversion, you could see a decline. i would not buy corrections corp up up there. not. if you already own it scale out of it into the lead conversion which should come in about three months. remember nobody ever got hurt taking a profit. >>> next up, last friday bill in california stumped me. well, i didn't want to offer an opinion yet. he wanted my opinio
for 30 some years at many different park service units across the united states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. customer erin swenson bought so, i'm happy. today. sales go up... i'm happy. it went out today... i'm happy. what if she's not home? (together) she won't be happy. use ups! she can get a text alert, reroute... even reschedule her package. it's ups my choice. are you happy? i'm happy. i'm happy. i'm happy. i'm happy. i'm happy. happy. happy. happy. happy. (together) happy. i love logistics. >>> why is no one worried about the transports? here's a question i was asked three times on friday. three times this weekend online. until the rebound today, this group has been horrendously weak. lots of people actually really are worried about the transports or they wouldn't be asking about them. second, it doesn't seem to matter that lots of people are worried about the transports, even if it say
that is the united states. the diverse portfolio of high-quality stocks, income producers, and growth stocks with solid dividend boosts. and of course, some gold. these have all been the correct calls to make. i've stuck with it because i believe the europeans are not suicidal. so far, so good on that front. i believe the chinese economy will simply come back by the virtue of the fact there is still tremendous urban migration within china. i believe the accommodative stance will serve as a bridge over a troubled fiscal cliff and will not take us down. at the same time, the fed's stance will continue to make higher dividend-paying companies in to gems that will all speak as a way to generate income. we'll continue to want to buy the stocks of cash-rich countries with yields that well exceed treasuries. and yes, we're going to want to own a lot of gold, specifically because there isn't a nation that doesn't want its currency lower in order to spur growth. you need a real reserve currency, not the dollar, and that reserve currency is gold. also not to toot my own horn too hard, but throughout t
.s. universities, over 40 universities in the united states and we've created over 20 companies to date and hundreds of jobs in those companies. >> a lot of people believe in this charged election season that business and the government can't work together, can't collaborate. i assume that this is an example that you would say belies that premise. >> we absolutely agree that the government and private equity can work together. there are many challenges that the dod is facing and they're coming up with solutions, technical solutions to that in cyber security, in wireless communications. those things have direct applications to the commercial marketplace and we can create companies around those and go to market here in the u.s. with them. >> give me some examples where in the past, defense oriented technologies or defense developed technologies have become a successful private market products and tell me as you think about this intellectual property that the government owns, what do you think has the most promise now for the next gen products? >> dod labs had had long been a rich source o
by examining 113 indicators from official data sources and polling 15,000 executives. united states continued a four-year slide to the seventh spot. separately, a judge ruling amr can abandon its pilot's union contract. saying the bankrupt parent of american airlines corrected certain issues that caused him to reject the same request in the past. amr is trying to save more than $1 billion a year in labor costs. it can unilaterally impose work terms on its pilot, all is happening as talks between amr and u.s. air continue. >>> in the meantime, a very complicated story. we've been trying to follow the twists and turns. the fbi now says there is no evidence to support claims that hacking group anonymous infiltrated an fbi agent's laptop and lifted data for more than 12 million apple products. however the front page of "the financial times" lays it out and says hackers embarrass apple with this data release. there were over a million different devices, numbers were published online. this is a story that has many odd twists. the hackers said they would not give any interviews about this breach unt
has been happening this morning? those viewers in the united states waking up, why are the apple workers in paris upset? >> for the last week, they've been extremely it is grunt he willed. all over the french media, they've been meeting with different management, complaining, in pact one of them was quoted as saying working at apple is like working in a coal mine. they've been complaining that they have to work longer hours than what they're paid for, that they don't get any commissions uneven though they're under constant pressure to sell. they're monitored by cameras in the stores and looking for things like a 13th month of pay as a bonus, higher pay and water fountains in the store. some of these things are standards for french workers, but they're complaining that apple has been extremely resistant to provide them these things. in fact they say they've been fighting for three years for the 13th month of pay. so at the end of yesterday, there was a sort of last resort meeting at which it was decided that these issues would be revisited before the end of the year, that the comp
industry can be to improve the perception of banking, which is at a 40-year low in the united states, and so many people who died were in the financial industry. i knew several and so i think our actions can be driven by the shareholders and if it's not driven by the shareholders, then it will be driven by the regular gla glators and part of the action is encourage the large banks to spin off certain underperforming divisions so the valuation could increase and right now the sum of the parts for many of these banks are far above where these market values exist. >> okay, mike. we appreciate that sentiment and the point. back to jamie dimon for a second and this idea of splitting up the banks. you raised this issue with him. what was his answer? >> he didn't say never, and the debate with jamie dimon got heated last thursday when i met with him, he's ceo of jpmorgan as you know, and he said if the discount is 50% and the businesses are no worse off, then he'd consider it, even jamie dimon would consider a splitup. he said it's extremely unlikely, they have all sorts of synergies and th
a month or so and you see iron ore stocks, you see machinery stocks in the united states and other parts of the world rally off the back of this notion of china stimulus, are all those things built on false expectations? >> we need to look at those charts. and most of those charts have fallen very sharply in the last two months. so what we experience through our trading book on friday with short coverings, we didn't see long-only investors coming in and buying stocks this morning. what i do think is different and you've highlighted that asia has recovered -- talking about a recovery -- the local investors do seem to be more excited by this new story than we've seen for some period of time. particularly noting that cement stocks rallied quite hard today in shanghai. so that is interesting that the local investors are somewhat more enthused about this story than we've seen for months. >> okay. adrian, thank you so much for phoning in. we appreciate it. adrian mowat of jpmorgan. >>> it's interesting this morning that stocks are essentially hanging on to the sharp gains that they made last w
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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